Year Enrolled
Enrolling
Academic Exclusions
Voluntary Withdrawals
Retention Rate*
Grad Total
Grad Rate
Retained Grad Rate**
2007 90 27 23 44.44% 40 44.44% 100%
2008 80 25 17 47.50% 36 45.00% 95%
2009 101 30 19 51.49% 51 50.50% 98%
2010 94 36 11 50.00% 47 50.00% 100%
2011 80 21 10 61.25% 44 55.00% 90%
2012 69 25 3 59.42% 38*** 55.07% 93%
2013 78 22 12 56.41%      
2014 65 21 7 56.92%      
2015 68 26 5 54.41%      

 

*Retention rate reflects those retained at the end of the first year of law school.
**Retained Grad Rate reflects the percentage of students that go on to graduate after their first successful year of law school.
***Two students are still enrolled and expected to graduate in 2017.

Graduate Bar Pass Rates*

Grad Year
# of Grads Taking
First Time Pass
First Time Pass Rate
Pass Overall
Overall Passing for Grad Class
2010 43  24 56% 40 93%
2011 31 20  65% 28 90%
2012 41 23  56% 35 85%
2013 52 29  56% 47 90%
2014 51 27  53% 41 80%
2015 32 10  31% 22 69%
2016 43 14  33% 26 60%

 

*Performance statistics for each administration of the California Bar Examination is available on the California State Bar website.

Graduate Class Summative Assessment History

Year
Number of Participants
Oral Assesment*
Written Assessment**
2011 28 89% 72%
2012 40 93% 83%
2014 50 100% 100%
2015 35 92% 98%

*Percent of students scoring at or above an "average professional" level.
**Percent of students scoring at or above an "average professional" level.

Employment Summaries

Employment Summary - Class of 2014 - All Graduates

Employment Status
Total
Total Graduates         51
Employed - Bar Passage Required 36       36
Employed – J.D. Advantage 12     1 13
Employed, Professional Position 1       1
Employed, Non-Professional Position          
Unemployed, seeking          
Unemployed, not seeking         1
Employment Status Unknown          

Employment Summary - Class of 2014 - Bar Passers

Employment Status
Total
Total Bar Passers         38
Employed - Bar Passage Required 36       36
Employed – J.D. Advantage 2       2
Employed, Professional Position          
Employed, Non-Professional Position          
Unemployed, seeking          
Unemployed, not seeking          
Employment Status Unknown          

 

Employment Summary - Class of 2015 - All Graduates

Employment Status
Total
Total Graduates         35
Employed - Bar Passage Required 12       12
Employed – J.D. Advantage 13   3   16
Employed, Professional Position          
Employed, Non-Professional Position          
Unemployed, seeking 2       2
Unemployed, not seeking 1       1
Employment Status Unknown 4       4

Employment Summary - Class of 2015 - Bar Passers

Employment Status
Total
Total Bar Passers         16
Employed - Bar Passage Required 12       12
Employed – J.D. Advantage 4       4
Employed, Professional Position          
Employed, Non-Professional Position          
Unemployed, seeking          
Unemployed, not seeking          
Employment Status Unknown          

Employment status definitions from the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar.

Employed - Bar Passage Required

A position in this category requires the graduate to pass a bar exam and to be licensed to practice law in one or more jurisdictions. The positions that have such a requirement are varied and include, for example, positions in law firms, business, or government. However, not all positions in law firms, business, or government require bar passage; for example, a paralegal position would not. Positions that require the graduate to pass a bar exam and be licensed after beginning employment in order to retain the position are included in this category. Judicial clerkships are also included in this category.

Employed – J.D. Advantage

A position in this category is one for which the employer sought an individual with a J.D., and perhaps even required a J.D., or for which the J.D. provided a demonstrable advantage in obtaining or performing the job, but which does not itself require bar passage or an active law license or involve practicing law. Examples of positions for which a J.D. is an advantage include a corporate contracts administrator, alternative dispute resolution specialist, government regulatory analyst, FBI agent, and accountant. Also included might be jobs in personnel or human resources, jobs with investment banks, jobs with consulting firms, jobs doing compliance work in business and industry, jobs in law firm professional development, and jobs in law school career services offices, admissions offices, or other law school administrative offices. Doctors or nurses who plan to work in a litigation, insurance, or risk management setting, or as expert witnesses, would fall into this category, as would journalists and teachers (in a higher education setting) of law and law related topics. It is an indicator that a position does not fall into this category if a J.D. is uncommon among persons holding such a position.

Employed – Professional Position

A position in this category is one that requires professional skills or training but for which a J.D. is neither required nor a demonstrable advantage. Examples of persons in this category include a math or science teacher, business manager, or performing arts specialist. Other examples include professions such as doctors, nurses, engineers, or architects, if a J.D. was not demonstrably advantageous in obtaining the position or in performing the duties of the position.

Employed – Non-Professional Position

A position in this category is one that does not require any special professional skills or training.

Short-term

A short-term position is one that has a definite term of less than one year. Thus, a clerkship that has a definite term of one year or more is not a short-term position. It also includes a position that is of an indefinite length if that position is not reasonably expected to last for one year or more.

A position that is envisioned by the graduate and the employer to extend for one year or more is not a short-term position even though it is conditioned on bar passage and licensure. Thus, a long-term position that is conditioned on passing the bar exam by a certain date does not become a short-term position because of the condition.

Long-term

A long-term position is one that the employer expects to last one year or more. A law school/university funded position that the law school expects to last one year or more may be considered long-term for purposes of this definition only if the graduate is paid at least $40,000 per year. The possibility that a short-term position may evolve into a long-term position does not make the position a long-term position.

Full-time

A full-time position is one in which the graduate works a minimum of 35 hours per week. A full-time position may be either short-term or long-term.

Part-time

A part-time position is one in which the graduate works less than 35 hours per week. A part-time position may be either short-term or long-term.

Student Learning Outcomes

SJCL Graduates Will

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the structures and processes of the U.S. legal system and foundational substantive law, including subjects tested on bar examinations.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in legal analysis and problem solving.
  • Demonstrate competence in written and oral communication in a variety of settings.
  • Demonstrate mastery of appropriate strategies and technologies to research legal issues effectively and efficiently.
  • Demonstrate the ability to recognize and resolve ethical issues and exhibit professionalism appropriate to the profession.
  • Demonstrate practical skills inherent in all aspects of legal practice.

Performance Criteria

Outcome 1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the structures and processes of the U.S. legal system and foundational substantive law, including subjects tested on bar examinations.

Graduates will demonstrate the ability to

  • Identify and comprehend the principles of the substantive subjects tested on bar examinations, including the evolution of that law and its policy underpinnings.
  • Identify and comprehend the structure and jurisdiction of federal and state courts in the United States and the function of precedent.
  • Explain the processes of federal and state civil procedure.

Outcome 2. Demonstrate proficiency in legal analysis and problem solving.

Graduates will demonstrate the ability to

  • Read critically applicable authority (Constitutions, statutes, administrative regulations, cases), including identifying relevant legal rules and underlying policy.
  • Identify key issues in a factual situation.
  • Synthesize relevant rules of law into a logical framework for analysis, including determining which rule a court is likely to apply where rules conflict.
  • Apply identified rules to the relevant facts and evaluate potential counterarguments to predict the likely outcome of the case.
  • Analogize the facts to and distinguish the facts from those of precedent cases to predict the likely outcome of the case.

Outcome 3. Demonstrate competence in written and oral communication in a variety of settings.

Graduates will demonstrate the ability to

  • Speak in a clear, concise, well-organized, well-reasoned and professional manner.
  • Speak effectively in both objective and persuasive styles as appropriate to the circumstances.
  • Write clear, concise, well-organized, well-reasoned, and professionally expressed documents.
  • Write effectively in both objective and persuasive styles as appropriate to the circumstances.
  • Cite appropriate authority with candor, including any relevant contrary authority.
  • Listen actively to clients, judges, and others.

Outcome 4. Demonstrate mastery of appropriate strategies and technologies to research legal issues effectively and efficiently.

Graduates will demonstrate the ability to

  • Design and implement a logical research plan, weighing time and resource constraints.
  • Employ appropriate resources and technologies to retrieve, use and manage research materials.
  • Assess accurately the weight of authority.

Outcome 5. Demonstrate the ability to recognize and resolve ethical issues and exhibit professionalism.

Graduates will demonstrate the ability to

  • Identify and comprehend the applicable law governing legal ethics.
  • Apply knowledge of legal ethics to representation of clients, performance of duties as an officer of the courts, and resolution of ethical dilemmas.
  • Demonstrate professional judgment and professionalism through conduct consistent with the legal profession’s values and standards.
  • Collaborate effectively with others in a variety of legal contexts.

Outcome 6. Demonstrate practical skills commonly used in legal practice.

Graduates will demonstrate the ability to

  • Recognize and appreciate litigation alternatives, including arbitration, mediation, and negotiation.
  • Identify the practical considerations in pursuing legal remedies.
  • Interview a client, accurately identifying the client’s objective.
  • Synopsize a client’s issue(s), including an assessment of the facts, culminating in a client letter or position memorandum.
  • Design a plan to resolve the client’s issue(s), tailored to the client’s objectives and legal options available.